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Thanks To The Annotated Version

December 3, 2009
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When The Alice Project began the class was constantly reminded to bring their copy of The Annotated Alice. That’s what this short blog is about. Giving my appreciation to the book.

If we were given a copy of the original Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, the students would have probably read the story, which wouldn’t have been any different, but then we would have been puzzled when it came to analyzing or coming up with new blog ideas. When the class read Lord of the Flies, although we had a normal copy of the story, we figured out themes, underlying meanings, etc. The difference is that when reading LOTF, we had a teacher pushing us along, stopping to discuss, and even giving us some clues. When The Alice Project started basically we were given a book, a schedule for quiz dates, and a laptop. The rest was up to us.

The Annotated Alice

If we read this like a children’s story, we may have gotten some themes or guesses as to what was happening between the lines. With the annotated version of the book, much of the information that we would have to look for between the lines, were written on the sides of the pages. Many notes that were in it gave us ideas to discuss, such as Carroll having the boy become a pig because he didn’t like boys. What was also helpful was the ‘An-Alice-Is” and background information on many of John Tenniel’s illustrations. Some information that seemed pointless eventually turned out to be helpful, and many of the poems included in the story we also clarified.

Overall, I want to show my thanks to Mr. Gardner for stockpiling these collection of “Alice” notes. They got me through the project.

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One Comment leave one →
  1. Kyle M. permalink
    December 3, 2009 7:53 pm

    You’re right that the Annotated version of the book served as a great ‘starting point’; still, many people pushed far beyond the annotations in their blogs, and that’s truly quite an achievement. I do indeed feel that we would have all produced astonishing content even without annotations to guide us along the way. Regardless, it was truly a great help. And even without bearing the blogs in mind, it contained a wealth of great information on its own.

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